Gender Equality As A Form Of Women Empowerment

Gender Equality As A Form Of Women Empowerment

Gender Equality As A Form Of Women Empowerment

Gender Equality As A Form Of Women Empowerment: Over the years, several advocates have been made for gender equality between the male and female gender. Historically, the female gender has always been seen as the weaker vessel that has to submit wholeheartedly and wholly to the superiority of the male gender. The gender inequality became so bad that all forms of inhumane and degrading treatments have been meted out to women just because they are perceived as the weaker ones who shouldn’t have voices of their own.

Gender equality is not only a fundamental human right, but a necessary foundation for a peaceful, prosperous and sustainable world. Unfortunately, at the current time, 1 in 5 women and girls between the ages of 15-49 have reported experiencing physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner within a 12-month period and 49 countries currently have no laws protecting women from domestic violence. Progress is occurring regarding harmful practices such as child marriage and FGM (Female Genital Mutilation), which has declined by 30% in the past decade, but there is still much work to be done to completely eliminate such practices.

Providing women and girls with equal access to education, health care, decent work, and representation in political and economic decision-making processes will fuel sustainable economies and benefit societies and humanity at large. Implementing new legal frameworks regarding female equality in the workplace and the eradication of harmful practices targeted at women is crucial to ending the gender-based discrimination prevalent in many countries around the world.

 

Worthy of note is the fact that the 19th century experienced numerous socioeconomic, demographic and cultural transformations. As a guideline for all these changes is the evolution in gender relations toward greater equality. The weakening of the patriarchal family model in parallel with the changing socioeconomic role of women explains the transition from a male-breadwinner family organization to a dual-earning model. Major demographic changes have been associated to this transition. The most striking one certainly is the fertility transition. The evolution of the marriage pattern mirrors a convergence in men and women’s roles within the household, notably due to the integration of women into market activities. The increase in female investments in education changed deeply the nature of available work for women. The dominant model became the expression of a convergence of male and female behaviors regarding their activity. Hence, women did not stop anymore their professional activity on the occasion of the birth of their children. There was no more choice, neither alternation, but a plurality between family and professional spheres: this was the blossoming of the dual-earning model (also referred to as the gender equity model. Each member of the household pursued a professional career, inducing a higher standard of living but fewer children.

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